Op-Ed: Artists have been ousted but Point Alameda awaits to fill a need

By Jonathan Farrell : digitaljournal – excerpt

San Francisco – As the cast and crew of “The Soiled Dove” make preparations for this weekend’s two-day extravaganza event, they are one among many who have displaced by the dramatic redevelopment of San Francisco’s Mission District…

“The Soiled Dove” now has a new home at Point Alameda just across the Bay from where they had been in San Francisco’s Mission District along Bryant Street.

Courtesy of “The Soiled Dove” and the Vau de Vire Society productions company…

Native San Francisco artist Cynthia Tom knows this all too well. She has lived in many areas of the City growing up. But for more than 22 years she made The Mission her home; especially the 1890 Bryant Street Studio and artists collective.

“It is a travesty,” she told this reporter. “That area (where ‘The Soiled Dove’ had been held) was one of those massive spaces where you could incubate just about anything and invite an audience.” Cynthia as a surrealist artist has grown both artistically and professionally, as well as personally over the years. Her talents and skills include event planning for her one-of-a-kind art installations, curating historical exhibits, counseling with a focus on healing and music. “My band, ‘Manicato’ even did some recording there at one time,” she said.

“1890 Bryant, the building I am in is highly affected by all this gentrification. We are 2 blocks away (from where ‘The Soiled Dove’ used to be). Our parking is slowly being taken away and I mean removed,” she said. For her to talk about it struck a nerve and then a list of spilled over.

“All bikes only, no parking all along 17th Street. 1 to 2 hour parking limits, so non-residential,” she said. 1890 Bryant, where I am is in, is an industrial versus residential area, eventhough parking is permittable for residential customers only. No one can park for long. Artists need vehicles to move our stuff around and there is no parking sometimes at all. They just built two large condos on Potrero Street and purposefully didn’t put in parking for every condo because they (the Planning Dept.) want to attract non-car residents.” For Cynthia and others like the artistic community she shares 1890 Bryant with, all this drastic ‘gentrification’ makes no sense.

“Basically the City is making it impossible to be a creative business,” Cynthia said, “Which is one of the reasons people come to the City. Taking the bus and biking is cool if you don’t have to transport large objects daily or if you rely on clients driving into town to buy your work and needing a way to get it home.”

“Space for creative businesses is disappearing with the snap of a finger,” she said. “Eventually San Francisco, it will be all restaurants and bars all too soon. But nowhere to visit after your meal.” This makes little sense to Cynthia and to the local artists that have thrived here for decades. “I guess you can stand in the street and admire all the condos,” she said…(more)

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