Richmond’s Rosie the Riveter festival celebrates women in the workplace

By Michael Bodley : sfgate – excerpt

A sea of red blanketed the bayside stretch of Richmond that’s home to the museum commemorating the life of Rosie the Riveter, the iconic yet fictional female factory worker who redefined the role of her many peers in World War II.

Rosie and the barrier-breaking life she represents has taken on a newfound significance of late, said a number of people taking in an annual event held in her memory at the National Homefront Historical Park.

As more than 1,000 attendees, most wearing Rosie’s traditional garb of coordinated red-and-white polka-dotted bandanas, rough, blue working shirts and jeans rolled up over red socks, milled around in a bracing breeze, a number of people said that something felt a little different this year…

Back in the crowd, as the jazz band belted out another rendition, a reporter asked a man why he was there. He declined to comment, saying the day belonged to females… (more)

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San Francisco’s Summer of Love 50th Anniversary Party Denied Permit

by thump.vice – excerpt

There may be no summer lovin’ in San Francisco this year.

A permit for an event celebrating the 50th anniversary of the city’s historic Summer of Love—during which thousands of young people (commonly called “hippies” and “flower children”) gathered in the Haight-Ashbury district in 1967 for what would become known as a major counterculture movement—was denied last week by the San Francisco parks and recreation department, reports The Guardian.

In their letter to event organizer Boots Hughston, they reportedly cited safety concerns, adding, “We cannot put the public at risk.”

The party, initially set to take place June 4 at Polo Field in Golden Gate Park, was proposed as a free, day-long concert. Artists supposedly confirmed to perform included Eric Burdon and War, Country Joe McDonald, Santana Blues Band’s original rhythm section, and the remaining members of Jefferson Airplane, who performed at the original gathering in 1967.

Hughston, who successfully organized the Summer of Love’s 40th anniversary celebration at Golden Gate Park’s Speedway Meadows with McDonald, Moby Grape, Taj Mahal, and more, said he plans to appeal the denial. An online petition has also acquired more than 1,500 signatures… (more)

Please sign and pass this along if you want to see the Summer of Love FREE concert tradition upheld and the true meaning of love remembered in the city where such sentiments are fading fast, becoming a relic of the past, as the rush for gold comes roaring back into the 21st Century.

Why Silicon Valley’s Young Elite Won’t Invest in Art

by James Tarmy : bloomburg – excerpt

A lot of money is flowing in and out of the bank accounts in the Bay Area—but it’s not going toward art, a traditionally San Francisco status symbol.

Walking through the frigid warehouse that housed the inaugural San Francisco edition of the Untitled Art Fair in January, 23-year-old entrepreneur Connor Zwick took in the fair’s 55 contemporary art galleries and was unimpressed.

“I look at art all the time and see a lot of art I like,” he said. “But it’s not correlated with price at all.”…

Trickle Down

San Francisco’s collectors come from virtually every sector: finance, real estate, venture capital, even retail. The city has an established arts culture, and its older families—the Schwabs, the Fishers, the Haases—have bought, and then donated, hundreds of millions, if not billions, of dollars’ worth of art. (The new wing at the city’s Museum of Modern Art is filled with works donated by the Fisher family.) But the highest echelons of the tech world—the new elite of San Francisco—have been slow to join them…

Culture Shift

Buell, the adviser, speculates that the rising ranks of tech managers will eventually get around to buying art, but “I think it’s going to take a little bit more time, I’ll be totally honest,” she said. “People in the art world are like ‘hurry up and spend money,’ but many of these guys are working their tails off,” she continued. “They’re just having their children and buying their first houses. I think the trickle-down will happen, but further down the line.”

Sanghvi, the engineer, said outsiders need to remember that the tech sector continuously deemphasizes ownership of anything, let alone million-dollar artworks. “Today, people aren’t inclined toward buying a home or car or owning things,” she said. “And there have been markets that have been developed to facilitate things that are communal—like Uber or Airbnb.” If you don’t own your house, in other words, you probably won’t spend tons of money to decorate it. “Most of the material things that we’ve traditionally invested in are no longer relevant for this generation,” she said… (more)

CAN Cultural Action Network – Call to action to Save the Mission

By Cultural Action Network
660

A flood of money, restaurants, housing, and office/tech projects is trying to push its way onto Mission St, most of it on N Mission St from 11th to 16th. For the first time ever SOMA will link up with Mission St and foot traffic will flow down from the north.

There are 21 projects of concern from 11th to 25th St. See attached map. It doesn’t look like Mission St, already struggling to hold on after hits from
the outflow of the Latino community, the internet, and the SFMTA red lanes
disaster, will withstand half of this influx of upscale people and the shop
turnover pressure that is already under way.

USM is opposed to these projects, and in particular has taken votes against the
Armory (50k office – to become a subsidized arts, PDR, maker space), the Impact
Tech Hub (25k, 500+ tech workers daily), and the Monster in the Mission (500+
upscale residents).

We have spoken to city officials about the idea of subsidizing an Armory
conversion and Sharon is trying to set up a meeting with SFMade. First action proposed so far is a Feb picketing of the tech hub which has begun
its conversion at 15th and Mission. SF Public Press has written a letter of 
support for them strangely, does anyone know them?

Please share your thoughts and standby for calls to action.

To clarify, our proposal to the city is to make the Armory a subsidized arts
and maker space.

Don’t forget about the plan to gentrify 16th Street and link it to the mess at General Hospital. The plan appears to be to circle the Mission with large development projects and crush it from the North, East, and West. All we can do is warn people what is coming it is up to them to act on the knowledge.

We need  to clear up our use of vocabulary if we want to communicate with the rest of the country. Makers are manufacturers if they create physical products and ship them. That is the traditional term for what makers do. We need to get back to basics and quit buying to the use smart tech speak if we want to unite the country. By claiming some industries are smart you insinuate that others are dumb. This is not true and we should avoid all confusing communications.

Little-known artist colony helps redefine concept of preservation

By John King : sfchronicle – excerpt

High above the entrance to Armstrong Redwoods State Natural Reserve in Guerneville, off a twisting road and through a gate that’s usually locked, stand Pond Farm’s two old houses and a stark wooden barn.

Between the barn and one decrepit house, long empty, there’s also a moss-blotted boulder topped by a formal bronze plaque: a memorial that reads in part “Marguerite Wildenhain … Artist, potter, friend.”

The plaque hints at a slice of Northern California cultural history, in which a short-lived artist colony left behind a determined ceramicist who shaped a legacy of her own in the decades that followed.

It’s the sort of place that until recently would have been torn down, consigned to memories. Instead, it’s a freshly preserved marker of how our region has and hasn’t changed — and how preservation itself is being redefined…(more)

RELATED:
Pond Farm – Saving Historic Places