Legion of Honor Museum on Mother’s Day

May 23, 2017

Monet the Early Years

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Urs Fischer in the Permanent Collection Rooms

Legion of Honor Museum//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Photos by zrants


San Francisco’s Summer of Love 50th Anniversary Party Denied Permit

February 16, 2017

by thump.vice – excerpt

There may be no summer lovin’ in San Francisco this year.

A permit for an event celebrating the 50th anniversary of the city’s historic Summer of Love—during which thousands of young people (commonly called “hippies” and “flower children”) gathered in the Haight-Ashbury district in 1967 for what would become known as a major counterculture movement—was denied last week by the San Francisco parks and recreation department, reports The Guardian.

In their letter to event organizer Boots Hughston, they reportedly cited safety concerns, adding, “We cannot put the public at risk.”

The party, initially set to take place June 4 at Polo Field in Golden Gate Park, was proposed as a free, day-long concert. Artists supposedly confirmed to perform included Eric Burdon and War, Country Joe McDonald, Santana Blues Band’s original rhythm section, and the remaining members of Jefferson Airplane, who performed at the original gathering in 1967.

Hughston, who successfully organized the Summer of Love’s 40th anniversary celebration at Golden Gate Park’s Speedway Meadows with McDonald, Moby Grape, Taj Mahal, and more, said he plans to appeal the denial. An online petition has also acquired more than 1,500 signatures… (more)

Please sign and pass this along if you want to see the Summer of Love FREE concert tradition upheld and the true meaning of love remembered in the city where such sentiments are fading fast, becoming a relic of the past, as the rush for gold comes roaring back into the 21st Century.


Why Silicon Valley’s Young Elite Won’t Invest in Art

February 2, 2017

by James Tarmy : bloomburg – excerpt

A lot of money is flowing in and out of the bank accounts in the Bay Area—but it’s not going toward art, a traditionally San Francisco status symbol.

Walking through the frigid warehouse that housed the inaugural San Francisco edition of the Untitled Art Fair in January, 23-year-old entrepreneur Connor Zwick took in the fair’s 55 contemporary art galleries and was unimpressed.

“I look at art all the time and see a lot of art I like,” he said. “But it’s not correlated with price at all.”…

Trickle Down

San Francisco’s collectors come from virtually every sector: finance, real estate, venture capital, even retail. The city has an established arts culture, and its older families—the Schwabs, the Fishers, the Haases—have bought, and then donated, hundreds of millions, if not billions, of dollars’ worth of art. (The new wing at the city’s Museum of Modern Art is filled with works donated by the Fisher family.) But the highest echelons of the tech world—the new elite of San Francisco—have been slow to join them…

Culture Shift

Buell, the adviser, speculates that the rising ranks of tech managers will eventually get around to buying art, but “I think it’s going to take a little bit more time, I’ll be totally honest,” she said. “People in the art world are like ‘hurry up and spend money,’ but many of these guys are working their tails off,” she continued. “They’re just having their children and buying their first houses. I think the trickle-down will happen, but further down the line.”

Sanghvi, the engineer, said outsiders need to remember that the tech sector continuously deemphasizes ownership of anything, let alone million-dollar artworks. “Today, people aren’t inclined toward buying a home or car or owning things,” she said. “And there have been markets that have been developed to facilitate things that are communal—like Uber or Airbnb.” If you don’t own your house, in other words, you probably won’t spend tons of money to decorate it. “Most of the material things that we’ve traditionally invested in are no longer relevant for this generation,” she said… (more)


CAN Cultural Action Network – Call to action to Save the Mission

January 29, 2017

By Cultural Action Network
660

A flood of money, restaurants, housing, and office/tech projects is trying to push its way onto Mission St, most of it on N Mission St from 11th to 16th. For the first time ever SOMA will link up with Mission St and foot traffic will flow down from the north.

There are 21 projects of concern from 11th to 25th St. See attached map. It doesn’t look like Mission St, already struggling to hold on after hits from
the outflow of the Latino community, the internet, and the SFMTA red lanes
disaster, will withstand half of this influx of upscale people and the shop
turnover pressure that is already under way.

USM is opposed to these projects, and in particular has taken votes against the
Armory (50k office – to become a subsidized arts, PDR, maker space), the Impact
Tech Hub (25k, 500+ tech workers daily), and the Monster in the Mission (500+
upscale residents).

We have spoken to city officials about the idea of subsidizing an Armory
conversion and Sharon is trying to set up a meeting with SFMade. First action proposed so far is a Feb picketing of the tech hub which has begun
its conversion at 15th and Mission. SF Public Press has written a letter of 
support for them strangely, does anyone know them?

Please share your thoughts and standby for calls to action.

To clarify, our proposal to the city is to make the Armory a subsidized arts
and maker space.

Don’t forget about the plan to gentrify 16th Street and link it to the mess at General Hospital. The plan appears to be to circle the Mission with large development projects and crush it from the North, East, and West. All we can do is warn people what is coming it is up to them to act on the knowledge.

We need  to clear up our use of vocabulary if we want to communicate with the rest of the country. Makers are manufacturers if they create physical products and ship them. That is the traditional term for what makers do. We need to get back to basics and quit buying to the use smart tech speak if we want to unite the country. By claiming some industries are smart you insinuate that others are dumb. This is not true and we should avoid all confusing communications.

Holiday Trees

December 1, 2016

holidaytrees

By Michael Rudnick


Little-known artist colony helps redefine concept of preservation

November 28, 2016

By John King : sfchronicle – excerpt

High above the entrance to Armstrong Redwoods State Natural Reserve in Guerneville, off a twisting road and through a gate that’s usually locked, stand Pond Farm’s two old houses and a stark wooden barn.

Between the barn and one decrepit house, long empty, there’s also a moss-blotted boulder topped by a formal bronze plaque: a memorial that reads in part “Marguerite Wildenhain … Artist, potter, friend.”

The plaque hints at a slice of Northern California cultural history, in which a short-lived artist colony left behind a determined ceramicist who shaped a legacy of her own in the decades that followed.

It’s the sort of place that until recently would have been torn down, consigned to memories. Instead, it’s a freshly preserved marker of how our region has and hasn’t changed — and how preservation itself is being redefined…(more)

RELATED:
Pond Farm – Saving Historic Places

 


Gentrification heartbreak in San Francisco

August 23, 2016

By : sfexaminer – excerpt

Every time I walk up to the Lower Haight, my heart hurts a little. Tucked away on Haight and Fillmore used to be my home — the only place in San Francisco I felt safe. It was the Empire Records-like atmosphere of D-Structure Clothing Company (DSF).

As of May of this year, they had to abandon their store and move everything online. No more art shows, no more PBR shotguns, no more community. I never truly felt the gentrification of this city affected my heart until my favorite place in the world shut down.

I first became acquainted with DSF from an open position on Craigslist. The post read, “Tell me why you want work here, why you are weird and what blogs you read.” I thought to myself, “I am definitely weird,” so I wrote a fabulous cover letter and got an interview.

I had just moved here from Tel Aviv and had no friends in town. I had a job in tech, but I didn’t have a huge team and they were all dudes. So I thought, maybe I would get a retail job somewhere and meet other people. This place that ended up accepting me into their work family.

The Lower Haight was full of eclectic people. It felt like everything was in balance…

It is clear why I am so heartbroken. But even more is how these types of hubs foster creativity and serve as a jumping off point for employees’ careers. Ex-employees now work as professional photographers, musicians, artists at Pixar, teachers at Workshop SF, DJs, tattoo artists and of course, writers. I have not yet found that level of support in any women’s group, meetup or job…

It seems like this story has been told all over the country. It’s just that here, we are actually losing our identity. I know a lot of people who moved here for the eccentricities of San Francisco. The weird fog, the learned people and the awesome food. People moved here for the culture. But with the rise of gentrification in the most artistic places, there is no longer as much room for creative excellence…

All of this begs the question: What came first, businesses closing or creative people leaving San Francisco? It seems like people are leaving for the same reason why the small venues are closing — the rent and cost of living is astronomical. As more and more creatives leave, it may cause these places to close. It is really all about money.

Unfortunately, economics is such a powerful force that these awesome places may not be able to survive. Superior service, great products, atmosphere, as well as a compelling value proposition has to win out. In that way, these very cool places that are no longer around, are really not much different than a tech start-up. The customer ultimately chooses what lives and what dies… (more)

Artists appreciate a writer who understands the role a creative community and environment plays in the work and lives of artists. We thrive in the company of other artists much as tech workers do, though our goals are generally more expressive than financially motivated. Society relies on us to provide the spice, and, what the corporate world describes as content they sell. Kill us off and you have nothing but re-runs.
The turn of the century dot-com boom cleared out the musicians and clubs around SOMA. Hundreds of people lost their rehearsal studios and many left for Southern California, Nashville and the Southwest, where they still welcome artists and some actually earn a living.
The community of artists struggling to stay have done the unthinkable and organized with affordable housing people and small businesses and non-profits to put a ballot initiative ordinance on the November ballot to protect more of our work space from the greed that is trying to eliminate us.
If you want to protect the arts in SF, support Yes on X. Details here: https://discoveryink.wordpress/..