Abstract Memories and Visions

Opening Reception and Artists’ Talk
Join Sofia Carmi and Robert La Rocca for their Opening Reception & Artists’ Talk at the Italian Cultural Institute.
In the exhibit Abstract Memories and Visions, artist Sofia Carmi shares with us her investigations of memories of Florence, Rome and Venice through painting. In Matthew Steen words, “for Carmi, abstract art is a mix of ‘memory, mystery, color, form and texture’ that captures the viewer, forcing an interpretation not immediately apparent. An Israeli native, she was closer to the center of the European art movement living in Jerusalem, influenced both by surrealist painters and the desert landscape surrounding her as she grew up. Her aunt, Lea Vogel, was a Holocaust survivor and renowned Israeli sculptor who was also a profound influence on her art. Carmi describes herself as a ‘modernist painting in the contemporary time.'” Carmi is strongly influenced by her Italian heritage.

Robert La Rocca was born and raised in North Beach, San Francisco, and received a degree on Landscape Architecture from UC  Berkeley and Harvard. In addition to a successful career as a Landscape Architect, La Rocca was President of San Francisco Art Commission and was appointed to the Board of Trustees of the San Francisco Botanical Gardens. His paintings of the last years have been an outgrowth of his profession in Landscape Architecture. In his words, “… I’m intrigued with overlapping images which make the composition more interesting–like writing a novel with several subplots. I like to trick the eye. In some cases, the lines go out to the space and it’s up to you to connect them… I’m interested in activation the entire wall space and in the impact on the viewer.”

OPENING RECEPTION & ARTISTS’ TALK
Friday, March 16, 2018 | 6:30pm
Free admission | RSVP Required
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New galleries bring buzz to San Francisco, but no gold rush—yet

by Jori Finkel : theartnewspaper – excerpt

Art scene is expanding into other parts of the city after high rents forced an exodus from downtown

After new spaces opened on the coattails of the dramatically expanded San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMoMA) last year—most notably Gagosian opening a branch within a few blocks—the city’s gallery scene continues to grow…

In January, the blue-chip Berggruen Gallery unveiled a three-floor, 10,000-sq. ft space South of Market, next door to Gagosian. The same week, former Matthew Marks director Adrian Rosenfeld opened a new space in the Minnesota Street Project in the scruffy Dogpatch neighborhood, joining Rena Bransten, Anglim Gilbert, and Altman Siegel, which ­relocated there in November.

The downtown exodus has been fueled by sky-high real estate prices. Claudia Altman Siegel, Catharine Clark and Stephen Wirtz all mentioned rent rises as a factor in leaving the 49 Geary building in recent years. Gretchen Berggruen said the gallery’s move, after 46 years on Grant Avenue, was prompted by a desire for more space and “amenities” that collectors expect, like parking. In effect, the city’s gallery scene is once again expanding after a contraction. But is the collector base that underlies it also keeping pace…(more)

The lack of interest in the arts can probably be traced back to the removal of art, music, and humanities from the public school curriculum. People with no education or appreciation of the arts are not likely to invest or become serious collectors. What passes for quality visuals these days is astonishingly bad. Take a look at the ugly buildings going up all over the place if you want to see a good argument for returning art to the classrooms.

Making News!

Artspan news

We’ve had some fantastic press coverage this year.
Check out this marvelous article in 7×7 about three of the art collectors we featured in Open Collections. Read Hoodline’s  feature on this weekend’s SF Open Studios artists in the Sunset, and listen to this interview with Joen Madonna on KALW’s Open Air.

Thanks to our media sponsor, KALW, for presenting public service announcements all month long. You may catch one while you are soaking up their creative and informative programming.

Good year for publicity as the artists struggle to keep their place in this historically art friendly city. San Francisco artists are joining others in cities all over the world and they are being out-priced and outed by the greed factor facing us all.