Legion of Honor Museum on Mother’s Day

May 23, 2017

Monet the Early Years

Legion of Honor Museum//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Urs Fischer in the Permanent Collection Rooms

Legion of Honor Museum//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Photos by zrants


It takes brains to make robots perform as art

April 6, 2017

By Charles Desmarais : sfgate – excerpt (includes video)

Kal Spelletich photo by Zrants

If robots kiss, is it a mechanical feat or a sentimental moment? What if their behavior is controlled by the brainwaves of two human beings?

San Francisco artist Kal Spelletich has built a career by hijacking ideas from engineering and science, then giving them the feel of flesh and blood. His show at Catharine Clark Gallery in 2015 was heavy with the pathos of the wired contemporary life, with jerky robotic figures acting the parts of personal friends at the push of a button.

For three performances this weekend at the experimental art space the Lab, identical 16-foot robots will move and interact, controlled by electrical impulses from the brains of two attendees. From the look of a preview video, the robots are more like giant disembodied arms with lethal claws than humanoids. Members of the audience will be fitted with electroencephalography, or EEG, monitoring helmets.

Most of the audience will not participate directly — only a few participants can be accommodated with the helmets. “We don’t know how many,” Spelletich said in a phone interview. “This is all new for us. Eight or 10?”

While Spelletich made the robots, the project is a collaboration with two others, Mitch Altman, a co-founder of Noisebridge hacker space, and Masahiro Kahata, who is described as a “psychotronics” specialist. An announcement calls the project “an experiment in improving people’s lives by exemplifying the poetry of the mind.”…

Kal Spelletich: Split Brain Robotics: 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, April 7-8; 1 p.m. Sunday, April 9. $8. The Lab, 2948 16th St., S.F. (415) 864-8855. www.thelab.org(more)


Artist Sofia Carmi Explores Inner and Outer Worlds

March 26, 2017

by Chuck Thurston : potreroview – excerpt

Image and art by Sofia Carmi

The University of California, San Francisco-Mission Bay Memory and Aging Center is an apt setting to exhibit paintings by Potrero Hill artist Sofia Carmi, who produced the works while healing from the recent loss of her long-time husband, artist Brent Bushnell.

Abstract art often attempts to connect the inner world of feelings and memories with the outer world of expressive colors, shapes, and textures, a process that Carmi finds stimulating. She referred to the creative metamorphosis of raw pigments into a meaningful painting as an “alchemical” process of transformation. Her paintings are a way of sharing this experience with others, with the hope that viewers will engage in their own metaphysical “dialog” with the work… (more)


New galleries bring buzz to San Francisco, but no gold rush—yet

February 20, 2017

by Jori Finkel : theartnewspaper – excerpt

Art scene is expanding into other parts of the city after high rents forced an exodus from downtown

After new spaces opened on the coattails of the dramatically expanded San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMoMA) last year—most notably Gagosian opening a branch within a few blocks—the city’s gallery scene continues to grow…

In January, the blue-chip Berggruen Gallery unveiled a three-floor, 10,000-sq. ft space South of Market, next door to Gagosian. The same week, former Matthew Marks director Adrian Rosenfeld opened a new space in the Minnesota Street Project in the scruffy Dogpatch neighborhood, joining Rena Bransten, Anglim Gilbert, and Altman Siegel, which ­relocated there in November.

The downtown exodus has been fueled by sky-high real estate prices. Claudia Altman Siegel, Catharine Clark and Stephen Wirtz all mentioned rent rises as a factor in leaving the 49 Geary building in recent years. Gretchen Berggruen said the gallery’s move, after 46 years on Grant Avenue, was prompted by a desire for more space and “amenities” that collectors expect, like parking. In effect, the city’s gallery scene is once again expanding after a contraction. But is the collector base that underlies it also keeping pace…(more)

The lack of interest in the arts can probably be traced back to the removal of art, music, and humanities from the public school curriculum. People with no education or appreciation of the arts are not likely to invest or become serious collectors. What passes for quality visuals these days is astonishingly bad. Take a look at the ugly buildings going up all over the place if you want to see a good argument for returning art to the classrooms.


San Francisco’s Summer of Love 50th Anniversary Party Denied Permit

February 16, 2017

by thump.vice – excerpt

There may be no summer lovin’ in San Francisco this year.

A permit for an event celebrating the 50th anniversary of the city’s historic Summer of Love—during which thousands of young people (commonly called “hippies” and “flower children”) gathered in the Haight-Ashbury district in 1967 for what would become known as a major counterculture movement—was denied last week by the San Francisco parks and recreation department, reports The Guardian.

In their letter to event organizer Boots Hughston, they reportedly cited safety concerns, adding, “We cannot put the public at risk.”

The party, initially set to take place June 4 at Polo Field in Golden Gate Park, was proposed as a free, day-long concert. Artists supposedly confirmed to perform included Eric Burdon and War, Country Joe McDonald, Santana Blues Band’s original rhythm section, and the remaining members of Jefferson Airplane, who performed at the original gathering in 1967.

Hughston, who successfully organized the Summer of Love’s 40th anniversary celebration at Golden Gate Park’s Speedway Meadows with McDonald, Moby Grape, Taj Mahal, and more, said he plans to appeal the denial. An online petition has also acquired more than 1,500 signatures… (more)

Please sign and pass this along if you want to see the Summer of Love FREE concert tradition upheld and the true meaning of love remembered in the city where such sentiments are fading fast, becoming a relic of the past, as the rush for gold comes roaring back into the 21st Century.


Why Silicon Valley’s Young Elite Won’t Invest in Art

February 2, 2017

by James Tarmy : bloomburg – excerpt

A lot of money is flowing in and out of the bank accounts in the Bay Area—but it’s not going toward art, a traditionally San Francisco status symbol.

Walking through the frigid warehouse that housed the inaugural San Francisco edition of the Untitled Art Fair in January, 23-year-old entrepreneur Connor Zwick took in the fair’s 55 contemporary art galleries and was unimpressed.

“I look at art all the time and see a lot of art I like,” he said. “But it’s not correlated with price at all.”…

Trickle Down

San Francisco’s collectors come from virtually every sector: finance, real estate, venture capital, even retail. The city has an established arts culture, and its older families—the Schwabs, the Fishers, the Haases—have bought, and then donated, hundreds of millions, if not billions, of dollars’ worth of art. (The new wing at the city’s Museum of Modern Art is filled with works donated by the Fisher family.) But the highest echelons of the tech world—the new elite of San Francisco—have been slow to join them…

Culture Shift

Buell, the adviser, speculates that the rising ranks of tech managers will eventually get around to buying art, but “I think it’s going to take a little bit more time, I’ll be totally honest,” she said. “People in the art world are like ‘hurry up and spend money,’ but many of these guys are working their tails off,” she continued. “They’re just having their children and buying their first houses. I think the trickle-down will happen, but further down the line.”

Sanghvi, the engineer, said outsiders need to remember that the tech sector continuously deemphasizes ownership of anything, let alone million-dollar artworks. “Today, people aren’t inclined toward buying a home or car or owning things,” she said. “And there have been markets that have been developed to facilitate things that are communal—like Uber or Airbnb.” If you don’t own your house, in other words, you probably won’t spend tons of money to decorate it. “Most of the material things that we’ve traditionally invested in are no longer relevant for this generation,” she said… (more)


CAN Cultural Action Network – Call to action to Save the Mission

January 29, 2017

By Cultural Action Network
660

A flood of money, restaurants, housing, and office/tech projects is trying to push its way onto Mission St, most of it on N Mission St from 11th to 16th. For the first time ever SOMA will link up with Mission St and foot traffic will flow down from the north.

There are 21 projects of concern from 11th to 25th St. See attached map. It doesn’t look like Mission St, already struggling to hold on after hits from
the outflow of the Latino community, the internet, and the SFMTA red lanes
disaster, will withstand half of this influx of upscale people and the shop
turnover pressure that is already under way.

USM is opposed to these projects, and in particular has taken votes against the
Armory (50k office – to become a subsidized arts, PDR, maker space), the Impact
Tech Hub (25k, 500+ tech workers daily), and the Monster in the Mission (500+
upscale residents).

We have spoken to city officials about the idea of subsidizing an Armory
conversion and Sharon is trying to set up a meeting with SFMade. First action proposed so far is a Feb picketing of the tech hub which has begun
its conversion at 15th and Mission. SF Public Press has written a letter of 
support for them strangely, does anyone know them?

Please share your thoughts and standby for calls to action.

To clarify, our proposal to the city is to make the Armory a subsidized arts
and maker space.

Don’t forget about the plan to gentrify 16th Street and link it to the mess at General Hospital. The plan appears to be to circle the Mission with large development projects and crush it from the North, East, and West. All we can do is warn people what is coming it is up to them to act on the knowledge.

We need  to clear up our use of vocabulary if we want to communicate with the rest of the country. Makers are manufacturers if they create physical products and ship them. That is the traditional term for what makers do. We need to get back to basics and quit buying to the use smart tech speak if we want to unite the country. By claiming some industries are smart you insinuate that others are dumb. This is not true and we should avoid all confusing communications.